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20130205
20130205
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
day. the city celebrating with a big parade. >> a little less than an inch. >> don't be surprised if you see more salt on the ground ben snow today -- than snow. many people wondering about that. i am scott thuman. >> i am cynne simpson. we will get to storm march coverage with jacqui jeras. where is the snow? >> it already moved through here. it went through hagerstown and martinsburg and they got a good testing. one or two inches in the panhandle of west virginia. the system fizzled around a d.c., so we came up with a lot of nothing. weak clippers sometimes fizzle as they move over the mountains. we do have another one waiting in the wings, so we expect another light snow showers or riflery's late tonight. most of that will stay to our north this time around. -- light snow showers or snow flurries. it is 37 degrees at reagan national, 29 in dallas, 312 in winchester. cloudy this morning, but temperatures will make it into the 40's. even warmer in the seven-day forecast. those details in a few minutes. let's talk about the roads jamee. >> as we get started on this tuesday morning
the rabbi talk about what i was doing, i said i was mayor of a city of newark. he said, i want to talk to you about the city of jerusalem. i thought we would talk about current events and foreign policy. he said, i want to talk to about the city of jerusalem in the year 66. he said, the year 66, titus and the romans laid siege to the city of jerusalem. the city of jerusalem would not relent. years and years passed by. finally, up one person told him that if you want to take the city, you need to wait and be patient. inside the city, there is a problem. that problem will grow into a cancer and that cancer will eat away the very core of that community. if you know your history, what happened around the year 70 is the divisions within the city of jerusalem amongst the zealots and others became so significant that it weakened the city from inside. the rabbi told me that the city of jerusalem was taken in the year 70 by titus. he looked at me for a long time and i looked at him. he said, what is the moral of the story? i said, make sure there are no zealots in newark. [laughter] he said no.
at the center of a plit conversation when at half time during a football game tragedy in kansas city. >> right jon: with the football player who killed himself and then his girlfriend. you spoke of a gun culture >> right jon: and... quoted jason whitt lock a columnist from kansas city and now writes for the fox sports website who never mentioned the second amendment or gun control but talked about a gun culture which i do believe exists. it's an attitude toward guns. obviously i think any sane person believes that we ought not to have high capacity magazines and assault rifles and that there ought to be background checks. you should be in a country where 40% of the gun purchases are done without a background check, where it's so easy to circumvent the existing laws. we can tighten all that stuff up without repealing the second amendment >> jon: how do you define it very quickly? >> you know what? i'm not exactly sure what sane is, but i know a lot of what i heard in the after math is insane >> jon: what did it feel like to be in the epicenter of i guess you became the polarizing magnet in the
for former new york city mayor who died friday at 88. then, a program with former u.s. navy sniper who was killed saturday in texas. followed by the prime minister's discussing the year -- the future of europe. >> on tuesday congressional budget office director rid of these is the disease 2013 budget and economic look. live starting at 2:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. also at 2:00 p.m., a bipartisan group of house members unveiled and trafficking legislation. you can watch that live on our companion network, c-span three. >> she said in her memoirs it was like a bright and beautiful dream. the most wonderful time of my life. the event that gives you some idea of how much she enjoyed being first lady in death she thought that her husband had finally achieve the recognition he deserved. >> historian on julia brand who married her brothers and west point roommate ulysses s. grant. first ladies, influence and damage, public and private lives, interests, and influence on the president's produced with the white house historical association preseason one begins present state of your 18th at
president of the united states in "cool age." sunday night at 8:00 on c-span q & a. >> new york city mayer -- koch served three terms as city's mayor. he died friday from conjective heart failure at the age of 88. it's twenty minutes. with the 8.4 million nighers who are grieving with you at this moment. ed, on the other hand has got to be loving the attention. i was particularly thrilled that he he picked this place. friend, family, and fellow new yorkers. everyone is here today. and i think there's no doubt that ed is beaming looking down on us assembled here, and i think it's fitting he picked the place a few blocks from a certain east river span. before last year's state of the city speech, if you remember, we reason a video -- ran a video that included a shot of ed standing at the entrance ramp yelling to the cars that approached, welcome to my bridge. welcome to my bridge! needless to say, it brought down the house. but what most people don't know is after the cameras stopped rolling, ed stayed out there in the freezing cold for another twenty minutes "welcome to my bridge! " he love
as for the city of new york, the state and the nation. i'm proud that we have been joined by several distinguished members of the congressional black caucus, which for more than four decades has been known as the conscience of the congress. and in that capacity, the congressional black caucus has year after year spent time trying to perfect our democracy and create a more perfect union. we confront that moment right now here in this great country of ours as we try and figure out how we deal with creating a pathway towards citizenship for the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants who are forced to toil in the shadow. we have been joined today as co-anchor for this next hour, distinguished classmate of mine from the great state of nevada, mr. horsford, who had the opportunity to be present while president obama delivered his remarks as it relates to immigration reform. and so i would like to ask mr. horsford if he might comment on the president's remarks and weigh in on the immigration debate from his perspective as a representative from an important state in nevada. mr. horsford: thank you,
. the syrian city of homs has seen some of the worst fighting of this civil war. as many as 20,000 people have died in the streets, but people do still live there, trying to create whatever normality they can. we have gone to see what they live is like for them. >> a fight to win the game. in this part ok homs, children get a chance to forget the war. everyone is trying to make the best of breaks between the fighting. i grant is part of a newly built market set up -- this playground is part of a newly built market set up by the local area. dozens of shops were hastily put up. she'd tell me there is an urgent need. >> displaced people could not get to their places of work. they started selling goods on the pavement, so a neighbor suggested setting up shops on a neighboring piece of land. glaxo much of the city has been destroyed. people here are eager to tell their stories, but some do not want to appear on camera, fearing arrest by security forces if they speak their mind. this man tells me he used to have a well paying job, but now he is selling through to try and make a living. he says he wa
with guns and are not in favor of gun control. if you grew up in a city, an urban environment with more guns and crime, you're probably less in favor of guns and more in favor of gun control. if that holds true, there is not going to be a huge majority in congress for gun-control. seems like it will be pretty split. host: including democrats? caller: including democrats, although a smaller number. some of the ones who were gun owners said that boehner is in favor of gun control. he said he was a gun owner, but that he believed that some gun controls, particularly background checks, are important. there were 120 republicans that own guns, only 46 democrats told us that they own guns. 76% of congress answered our questions. host: why did people not answer your question? caller: they gave a variety of reasons. we had about 60 people total applying by saying that they would not talk about it. several said that it was safety reasons, that they did not think it was appropriate to talk about their security. several of them said that they did not want to tell burglars that they had guns, because bur
been covering this and joins us from midland city, alabama. what a huge relief for this community. tell me what you are hearing about how they pulled off this raid. >> reporter: we just spoke with the local sheriff here and he told us it's still have much an. >> crime scene and ongoing investigation though details are being released. we know from federal official they were able to see inside of that bunker which is how they had knowledge jimmy lee dykes had a gun. fbi officials did confirm via e-mail that he thinks dykes was killed by law enforcement. but the fbi is processing the scene and they will release details about the shooting of dykes very soon. he says it's very important that the agency keeps certain tactics private. the feds need to protect their resources. a loud boom was heard on the scene when police stormed the bunker. they felt he was in imminent danger. last night they continued to sweep the property to check for buried bombs while the neighborhood behind me does in fact remain evacuated. martha: that little boy is celebrating a very big day tomorrow. i can't imagine w
is personal. i've seen the tent cities firsthand. i have spoken with the women. i have counseled the victims and witnessed the scars of indignation and pain. i feel the anguish in my bones. but i also feel the hope. let's work together to ensure that no woman in haiti, no woman in this hemisphere or in this world has to bear the indignity of sexual violence. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, for five minutes. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. the constitution of the united states of america was written to put in statute the limits of government's authority over citizens. it does not bestow rights or permit freedoms upon american people. rather, it delimits what government of the people, by the people and for the people can and cannot do. since well before our country's founding, americans have exercised the right to keep and bear arms, a right formerly protected by the ratification of the second amendment in 1791. as a life-long defender of seco
with us victor blackwell in midland city in alabama watching this unfold. victor, first, let me start with you. the standoff stretched for seven days and ended in just a mere matter of minutes. are we getting any more information from officials on why they decided to go in, how they decided to go in, and how they pulled this off? >> reporter: exactly. and this is a blend of both military science and social science. i will leave the military end up to chris. i'll tell you about the other element. we have reached out to the fbi contact, we have been speaking to this week, alabama state police, some sources who were close to the situation. we know this came down to the last 24 hours. and the fbi hostage rescue team, it's more than just the guys who go in to pull the child out. there are behavioral scientists, tactical technicians, the fbi swat, the negotiators, they are all here at the same time. we know in the last 24 hours, the communications with jimmy lee dykes became agitated. he continued to talk, but as it went on and on, he became less willing to negotiate, we heard from alabama
] welcoming cities how could the fez pants and households turn themselves in to developing the cities. and how to find a wide model. how to find a solutions to -- how could we connect with it actual industries. there is still a long journey to go. the second about consumption. right now it's 35%. which is below the world average of 60%. u.s. consumption rate around 70%. huge gap. if we want to really have consumption contribute more to the growth we need to -- such as disparity and income level, social security system, then we have to lead have different level of reform [inaudible] measure of urbanization and the driving to the consumption. which for the topic two foreign guests. i -- to talk about how to drive internal consumption and robert, contribute on social security in china. during urbanization. how people can turn themselves in to city dwellers can contribute. no listen, please. >> the opportunity to continue to urbanize we believe can have 200 billion people moving in to urban center over the next eight to ten years. that's an enormous opportunity. consumption is low, and particular
: meetings at the white house on the tame -- same topics. you couldn't have this in any other city in the country. new york saying good-bye to ed koch the three-term governor. did you ever meet him? mayor. ran for governor, lost. >> i think i met him once at a conference briefly. he was a force of nature. he just knew how to -- he was just -- he knew how to command a room. very entertaining person. when i was working for jerry brown, jerry brown would never go to official meetings of mayors or governors or whatever. we used to send me. and i think it was during one of the conventions in new york that the mayor then, mayor koch, had a reception for the governors at gracey mansion. jerry brown refused to go. so he sent me. and i would -- i was in my 20s. i introduced myself. to the mayor. he was so glad to see me. oh jerry brown. then he took me around personally and introduced me to every governor who was there. that was the kind of guy he was. just took me under his wing. it was just great. >> that's funny. >> bill: yesterday everybody there was 2500 people at this service. at this
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: tom donilon is here, he is the president's national security advisor. part of his job is to prepare and deliver the presidential daily brief on national security. joe biden has called him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are sch
, part of the city's celebrity series, at the beginning of just their second-ever visit to the u.s. backstage, musicians aged 15 to 36 warmed up and chatted in a variety of languages. >> no, no, no! >> brown: at rehearsal, barenboim was a tough taskmaster... >> you see how much more space you have for a crescendo? please don't play mechanically. >> brown: ...cajoling his young musicians. >> you're just playing comfortably without any idea of thought. ya-ba-ba-ba. what is that? >> brown: i watched the rehearsal, and you were pretty tough on them at various points. you kept saying, "you're playing too comfortably." what does that mean? >> it means that to make music, to express music, you cannot adopt the line of least resistance. you have to adopt the line of most resistance. music is not politically correct. music demands total concentration and the perfect, perfect matrimony between thought, feeling, and gut. >> brown: so how? >> and people who think it's easy should choose another profession. >> brown: uncompromising in his music, barenboim is also uncompromising in his politic
've appeared regularly in europe and asia. we caught up with them at boston's symphony hall, part of the city's celebrity series, at the beginning of just their second-ever visit to the u.s. backstage, musicians aged 15 to 36 warmed up and chatted in a variety of languages. >> no, no, no! >> brown: at rehearsal, barenboim was a tough taskmaster... >> you see how much more space you have for a crescendo? please don't play mechanically. >> brown: ...cajoling his young musicians. >> you're just playing comfortably without any idea of thought. ya-ba-ba-ba. what is that? >> brown: i watched the rehearsal, and you were pretty tough on them at various points. you kept saying, "you're playing too comfortably." what does that mean? >> it means that to make music, to express music, you cannot adopt the line of least resistance. you have to adopt the line of most resistance. music is not politically correct. music demands total concentration and the perfect, perfect matrimony between thought, feeling, and gut. >> brown: so how? >> and people who think it's easy should choose another profession. >> brown
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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